50 Screen Free Winter Activities for Kids While You Work

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Brr…winter brings shorter days, warm fires, snow, and ice. It also brings days spent inside, and sometimes a bad case of cabin fever. If your kids are getting antsy and you can’t find any time to work, these screen free winter activities for kids will help.

My kids enjoyed helping me brainstorm this list, and love being able to pick something different to work on each day during Family Writing Time. I’ve broken them down by theme, to make my list easy to use. Simply find a topic your kids enjoy, and pick an activity.

Snowman Fun

Do you want to build a snowman? Instead of braving the cold, have your child:

  • Write the lyrics to that popular Frozen song
  • Create a snowman set by cutting out paper balls, hats, arms, eyes, and anything else that comes to their mind. Then they can assemble and reassemble!
  • Read a book or two about snowmen.
  • Write a “How to” guide for building a snowman – they can even add pictures and then have someone try to follow their directions. Did they forget any important steps?
  • Draw pictures of your family as snowmen

Snow

Snowmen aren’t the only fun thing about snow! Your child can explore fun in the snow with these activities:

  • Research Snowflake Bentley and what he discovered about snowflakes.
  • Cut snowflakes out of paper, trying a variety of strategies.
  • Make a list of all the songs that have the word snow in them.
  • Create a “Snow Day” activity list.
  • Write up a safety plan for a blizzard.
  • Read The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Decorating Cookies

Winter is the only season where I bring out the cookie cutters to actually make cookies. We make these cookies for Christmas and Valentine’s Day. But, it doesn’t have to be a special occasion to have your kids learn and play with cookie themes. Let your kids do some cookie activities like these:

  • Use cookie cutters to draw patterns.
  • Draw beautiful cookies on a paper plate.
  • Create cookie cutouts from paper and use different colored paper toppings to decorate them.
  • Research cookie decorating techniques.
  • Find a new recipe for cookies in a cookbook and make a shopping list.

Here are 50 different winter activities to engage your kids while you work.

Football

Does your family enjoy watching football, or playing it? Here are some activities inspired by this popular sport:

  • Create a custom set of football trading cards on index cards
  • Make a bracket and predict who will win
  • Check scores in the newspaper
  • Make a list of questions they’d ask if they could interview a favorite player
  • Write a football shape poem
  • Draw a picture of a football game
  • Make a list of tailgating recipes
  • Find recipes for a Super Bowl party

Fire

Is the weather outside frightful? Good thing the fire is so delightful!

These fire inspired activities will help warm everyone up!

  • Create a wood cutting set with paper people, a chainsaw, an ax, truck, trees, and logs.
  • Draw a picture of a fire in the fireplace.
  • Read a book in front of your fireplace.
  • Make a list of words that rhyme with fire, smoke, and log.
  • Write words that describe a fire.
  • Research techniques for starting a fire.
  • Create a fire safety plan or escape map for your house.
  • Create a picture book demonstrating the “Stop, Drop, and Roll” strategy.

Penguins

These cute birds are a fun topic to learn about in the winter! Your child can:

The Winter Olympics

Every two years the Winter Olympics are held. Even if it’s not an Olympic year, it’s a great topic for kids to learn about. They can:

  • Make a list of all the winter sports they can think of.
  • Draw pictures of themselves competing in an event of choice
  • Make a snowboarding course out of file folders and a shoe box
  • Make a mini figure-skating set with pipe cleaners.
  • Write the words to the national anthem. Have them look up the other verses if desired.
  • Color Winter Olympic themed coloring pages.
  • Write a story about preparing to compete in the Olympics.
  • Compare and contrast the winter and summer games.

Hibernation

Some animals hibernate in the winter! Let your child explore this topic by:

  • Creating a cave under the table and making a bed to hibernate in while they read books.
  • Drawing pictures of animals that hibernate.
  • Make a paper set of bears, food, a cave, and snowflakes. Your child can cut all these out, and then use the pieces to tell a story about  a bear eating, and then settling down for the winter.
  • Write a poem about an animal preparing to hibernate.
  • Write a story about a hibernating animal waking up too soon.

What Will You Do While Your Kids Are Engaged In These Screen Free Winter Activities?

Once you get your kids engaged in a winter activity, you’ll have a bit of time to cross some tasks off your to-do list. Here are some that I enjoy working on.

  • Outlining a blog post
  • Researching for a blog post
  • Drafting a post
  • Scheduling social media updates for the week
  • Responding to comments
  • Creating a content calendar
  • Brainstorming new post ideas
  • Pitching for new freelance writing gigs

So get your kids engaged and get moving.

Need More Engaging Screen Free Ideas for Your Kids?

If you’re looking for more topics for your kids to explore, my Ultimate Guide to a Successful Family Writing Time eBook has plenty for you to choose from.

It’ll also help you get started with Family Writing Time, the strategy I use to get 2.5 hours to work on my business each week.

 

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Mompreneur - Freelance Writer & VA, Blogger at Lisa Tanner Writing

Lisa Tanner loves helping busy moms find time to grow their own business. As a homeschooling mom to nine, she knows a thing or two about balancing diapers and deadlines.